Grove Pick and Pack

Visitors pick three varieties of citrus fruit, differentiated by color, from child-height trees. The plucked fruit is put into wheelbarrows that can then be emptied into a concentrator chute that empties them onto a conveyor belt that can be hand-cranked to empty into a distribution turntable. That turntable can be cranked to turn and deposit the fruit onto a distribution conveyor belt which is then hand-cranked to deposit the fruit onto a sorting table.

Description

Visitors pick three varieties of citrus fruit, differentiated by color, from child-height trees. The plucked fruit is put into wheelbarrows that can then be emptied into a concentrator chute that empties them onto a conveyor belt that can be hand-cranked to empty into a distribution turntable.

That turntable can be cranked to turn and deposit the fruit onto a distribution conveyor belt which is then hand-cranked to deposit the fruit onto a sorting table. This will allow the children to sort the fruit by color onto the distribution table which has matching color-coded sections. The sorted fruit is finally then deposited into a “distribution box” by color which will send the fruit back to the appropriate tree, travelling through clear hoses across the ceiling.

All the steps require fine and gross motor skills and some coordination to move the fruit from picking through distribution. There is color identification and color-matching, plus math when the fruit is counted. This is also an example of the multi-level learning experience that can be delivered by an intelligently-designed exhibit.

For the little ones, the three fruit are oranges (orange), lemons (yellow), and limes (green). However, for older kids, these can be represented as fully ripe oranges (orange), partially ripe oranges (yellow), and unripe oranges (green). This then leads to an entire lesson on why pickers pick unripe oranges, which leads to a discussion about packaging and shipping overseas. Caters from 4 – 14.

Sample Activity for Educators

Grove Pick and Pack Activity: Dollar Signs

This activity provides students with the opportunity to practice addition, subtraction and estimating using the sum of two numbers.

Scenario:

You are the owner of the Farmer’s Market located inside the Grove Pick and Pack. At the end of the day, you’d like to have a profit of $100. Each item in your Farmer’s Market costs a certain amount (fruit = $2 each; vegetables = $3 each).

Problem 1:

If each customer purchases $10 worth of fruit and vegetables, how many customers do you need to have by the end of the day to make your $100 profit goal?

Problem 2:

If you only sell fruit, what is the least amount of fruit you need to sell to make your $100 profit? What about if you only sell vegetables?

Problem 3:

If each item (fruits and vegetables) costs $1 each, how much money would you have if you sold everything?

Problem 4:

How many different combinations of fruits and vegetables can you make that cost $12? What about $24? What about $48?

Problem 5:

If you only have $25 to spend, what is the largest amount of fruit you can purchase? What about vegetables? Do you have any money left over?

What to do next:

  1. Ask about which fruits and vegetables the students like best. Should those cost more or less than the ones no one likes?
  2. Estimate the total cost of all the items in your shopping basket without counting or calculating. Was your estimate close to the actual price?

Count the total number of green, yellow and orange “oranges” in the pick and pack. How much profit would you make if you sold all of each color?

Download PDF of This Activity, plus Related Common Core Standards. Includes Common Core Standards & Activities for other exhibits: